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Elizabeth Huntington to Bethia Huntington, Oct. 1, 1844

18441001_.pdf

Revision as of Oct 19, 2016, 10:01:32 AM
edited by Scout Boynton
Revision as of Nov 1, 2019, 7:23:24 PM
edited by Susanafeldman
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Miss B. T. Huntington
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Northampton-
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Elm Valley Oct. 1st 1844  
 
Elm Valley Oct. 1st 1844  
 
My very Dear [https://www.ats.amherst.edu/globalvalley/exhibits/show/pph-papers/people/bethiah Bethia],  
 
My very Dear [https://www.ats.amherst.edu/globalvalley/exhibits/show/pph-papers/people/bethiah Bethia],  

Revision as of Nov 1, 2019, 7:23:24 PM

Miss B. T. Huntington

Northampton-

Elm Valley Oct. 1st 1844 My very Dear Bethia,

The time seems long since we last met. so I write a few lines to fill up a small space in the gap. It is cheering to look at each other on the sabbath. as well as to look up to our Father, in his own appointed way. We all kept close last sabbath; and could hardly keep warm by a good fire. Much of the day, I spent reading Martha Reid. It is delightful to find so much devout and holy feeling in any human heart. and so much self sacrifice and benevolence in any character. I should be quite discouraged, did I not find in my own experience the hunger and thirst after these virtues, if nothing more; and I think of heaven, as to be desired chiefly, because we hope to be freed from the imperfections and sins of the mortal state. I send the book to you thinking you may like to refresh your memory with some of its lessons – perhaps you may find somethings in it. too which will be suitable and interesting to our dear Helen … –you do not know how much those dear children are in my faith and prayers, God grant that the memory of their mother and sister, with the other teachings which they receive, may effectually convince them of the uncertain and unsatisfactory nature of temporal things, and had them to take hold with as firm grasp of the things which are satisfactory and eternal.

What I have been writing will hardly be in accordance with the engagements of tomorrow – but it will be well if we can “enjoy as well as use this world as not abusing it.” –Mrs Adams was here Thursday and Friday and completed her part of the work. –I finished mine all but the cape on saturday–. Sarah’s mother, who arrived yesterday, will probably go over to the fair tomorrow with Theodore and his wife. –Eliza Lyon and Mrs Goodale thinks of going the day after –. Eliza gave us a very interesting and minute account of the wedding – your father [wished] the world with it to Mrs. Fisher. –I have been trying to persuade him to [answer] her letter to us – but he does not feel inclined – if he goes over tomorrow, consult with him about what kind of an outside garment will be suitable for him. If you get your cloak dyed perhaps I had better get my old merino done too – Will you be so kind as to ask Charles what was the cost of the marble cross in his lot at the Grave Yard?– How solemn are the feelings which October revives! May they inspire us with a strong faith in the truth and promises of Him who came to show us the Father. –

Wednesday morning –Theodore has gone [away]. Mrs. Matthews to Amherst to take the [stage] – your father cracked some butternut, the other day and gave to me. I picked out the meats and send them to you, with some plumbs – only a taste, we had very few this year. – only here and there one. – I should ask you to come over, but would avoid any thing that might appear to Charles like discontent. – The mercies which surround us are more than we can reckon up – may they not be forgotten or unimproved – Tell the children I love them all dearly – love to Charles –

your affectionate mother Elizabeth